The Sysadmin’s Daily Grind: smap


Article from Issue 77/2007

On a trip to Berlin, Charly discovers that the nmap port scanner has a new cousin who enjoys spying on phones – smap scans networks for VoIP devices.

The CCC Congress has become one of my favorite events. I mainly visit the congress because of the excellent talks and workshops, but it’s also a kind of community gathering where I might see people who I don’t see for the rest of the year, although we regularly exchange email, chat on IRC, or even talk on the phone. Apart from that, it’s a good thing to mingle with your own kind – sys admins, that is – from time to time.

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