Studies in Linux data storage

SAVE IT

Article from Issue 115/2010
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This month we look at filesystems for SSDs and show you how to get connected with a Windows Active Directory file server.

Life was so easy when the all the data for a standalone computer stayed on a little local hard drive. If the hard disk died, you were out of luck (unless you had the habit of performing regular backups to a tape drive or a bevy of floppy disks), but as long as it was working, you never had to worry about connectivity, network authentication, and the array of hardware and filesystem compatibility issues facing today’s IT professionals.

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