Searching in large logfiles with Glogg

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Article from Issue 139/2012
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Programmers and Linux administrators appreciate the benefits of event logs. The Glogg tool is the perfect choice for searching even large logfiles.

Linux is a pretty verbose operating system, in that many services generate messages for all kinds of events and write them in logfiles that typically reside in /var/log. When a system is hit by unexpected hiccups and glitches, investigating the logfiles can give you a relatively easy way to find the offending culprit – even if you’re not an expert.

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