Chroot jails made simpler

Reducing Labor

Even with jailkit, setting up a chroot jail is not an easy task. If nothing else, you still need to decide on the chroot's contents. In addition, jailkit's documentation is light, and you may still need to find examples that you can modify.

However, these tasks are even more laborious done with the chroot command alone. The chroot command requires an extremely long command, and, even then, much of the jail's configuration must be done manually. By contrast, while jailkit does not do everything for you, it does take much of the effort out of ordinary housekeeping for a chroot jail. By doing so, it makes this venerable bit of Unix technology available to everyone.

The Author

Bruce Byfield is a computer journalist and a freelance writer and editor specializing in free and open source software. In addition to his writing projects, he also teaches live and e-learning courses. In his spare time, Bruce writes about Northwest coast art (http://brucebyfield.wordpress.com). He is also co-founder of Prentice Pieces, a blog about writing and fantasy at https://prenticepieces.com/.

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