Glossary

We have collected a few important topics about the content of Linux Magazine.

Here you can read short descriptions, get advices for further reading and find appropriate magazines for a specific subject.

27.06.2014

On the DVD

The new Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon Edition long-term support release offers five years of upgrades, tweaks, improvements, and stability through 2019. Mint 17 has spiffed up its appearance and made changes so apps launch faster and use fewer resources.

06.06.2014

Home Away from Home

The Cygwin environment lets you run Linux applications on a Windows system.

02.04.2014

Multifunctional

Many Linux distributions seek to be all-around systems, fulfilling the user's every desire on the desktop. The 4MLinux distro offers feature-oriented variants without the bulk.

30.01.2014

Ask Klaus

Klaus Knopper answers your Linux questions.

02.01.2014

Ask Klaus!

 

22.11.2013

Through the Window

Microsoft provides a collection of tools for faster and more efficient Linux virtualization in the Hyper-V environment.

25.10.2013

On the DVD

This month's DVD features two terrific distributions, ArtistX 1.5 and Arch Linux 2013.10.01.

30.09.2013

Image Game

Microsoft has an entire portfolio of pre-built virtual machines, all of them Linux systems, designed to run on the Windows Azure cloud service.

30.09.2013

On the DVD

This month's DVD features two great distributions, Fedora 19 Security Spin and Kali Linux.

01.08.2013

Code Cleanup

"maddog" and Linaro are collaborating on a contest to improve the performance of certain GNU/Linux source code modules.

20.05.2013

Interoperability

We look at SharePoint integration and show you how to manage Active Directory from Linux. But first, a special story on a dangerous new class of intrusion tools.

20.05.2013

In Control

Two hobbies are prevalent in my house: Lionel trains and Linux computers. The train layout isn’t a permanent fixture; it gets set up a couple of times a year – usually around Christmas – but it’s been known to appear during the summer as well. The last time it appeared, I added a Linux computer to control the setup. Although I still run the trains with traditional throttles, I let the computer play with the rest. 

Rather than write one massive control program, I decided to split the design into single-purpose modules that run independently (Figure 1). Each module performs a single task in either the input, output, or control categories. Any given input or output module corresponds directly to a specific piece of hardware. Control modules don’t have hardware equivalents but instead provide the logic that links the inputs and outputs. Any number of modules can be run simultaneously.

The modules are written in Python and use mmap to communicate among themselves. The files inputs.txt, which represents the current state of the railroad’s sensors, and outputs.txt, which has the requested state for the relays or LEDs that activate working accessories, are memory-mapped files. They are both initialized to a single line of 100 zeros.

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