Accessing NTFS on a dual-boot system with Captive

CAPTIVE UNLEASHED

Article from Issue 74/2007
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Captive offers access to NTFS through the original Windows driver. We tried out Captive 1.1.7 in a real-world dual-boot scenario with low-end hardware.

For many users of Linux, dual-booting has become part of the daily routine. No matter how hard you try, there will always be that final proprietary application that you or your customers rely on, and that means resorting to the Windows operating system on a regular basis. Exchanging data between two wildly different filesystems on a dual-boot machine can be a trying experience, however. Although users take mainstream Linux kernel read support for Windows-style NTFS partitions for granted, write support for the closed source filesystem is a more complex matter that has frustrated Linux programmers and users alike for many a year.

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