Deflated

Deflated

Article from Issue 215/2018
Author(s): , Author(s):

Data compression costs virtually no computing power today. Why not save some space by putting data compression techniques to work on RAM and cache memory?

Random access memory (RAM) is used to store data for ongoing operations. RAM has an ultra-short access time, but it is comparatively expensive to buy. Moreover, you cannot extend RAM infinitely, because the board can only take a certain size and only offers a fixed number of slots for it. Additionally, memory modules for older devices are sometimes difficult to obtain.

Instead of adding more RAM to the computer, another approach is to make more data fit in the RAM you already have. Current computers are fast enough that on-the-fly data compression hardly makes a difference to the total execution time. Data compression started as a technology for archiving data on hard disks, but you can also use compression for data in RAM memory.

The three methods, zram, zswap, and zcache, provide three implementations that extend content compression to RAM. These features made it into the main kernel branch [1] in the 3.14 kernel, but haven't received much everyday use. Only Android 4.4 and Knoppix 7 or higher activate zram by default.

[...]

Use Express-Checkout link below to read the full article (PDF).

Buy this article as PDF

Express-Checkout as PDF
Price $2.95
(incl. VAT)

Buy Linux Magazine

SINGLE ISSUES
 
SUBSCRIPTIONS
 
TABLET & SMARTPHONE APPS
Get it on Google Play

US / Canada

Get it on Google Play

UK / Australia

Related content

  • Ask Klaus!

    Klaus Knopper is the creator of Knoppix and co-founder of LinuxTag expo. He currently works as a teacher, programmer, and consultant. If you have a configuration problem, or if you just want to learn more about how Linux works, send your questions to: klaus@linux-magazine.com

  • Ask Klaus!

    Klaus Knopper is the creator of Knoppix and co-founder of LinuxTag expo. He currently works as a teacher, programmer, and consultant. If you have a configuration problem, or if you just want to learn more about how Linux works, send your questions to: klaus@linux-magazine.com

  • Unmasking Fake Flash Memory

    When it comes to cheap flash memory, buyers should beware. Fake flash memory often offers only a fraction of the advertised storage capacity. With no visible calibration mark, it isn't easy to discover a counterfeit. Here's a test to weed out fake disks.

  • On the DVD: Knoppix 7.0.4

    The latest Knoppix Live Linux DVD is based on Debian stable (squeeze) with newer desktop packages from Debian/ testing and Debian/ unstable (wheezy). Current computer hardware is supported by kernel 3.4.9 and Xorg 7.7 (core 1.12.3), and the Apt database now contains all data necessary to install software directly via Synaptic.

  • December 2012: DVD Inlay
comments powered by Disqus

Direct Download

Read full article as PDF:

Price $2.95

News