Log2Ram and frontail

Charly's Column – Log2Ram and frontail

Article from Issue 226/2019
Author(s):

If you run 25 Raspberry Pis at home, and an equal number of other IP devices, you might also think like Charly does when it comes to log management. The result is atomic technology and a logfile disk that is not permanently overloaded.

From time to time, I use nmap -sP 10.0.0.1-254 to check how many IP devices are online in my home network. There are now more than 50, half of them Raspberry Pis. The need for a central syslog server is slowly growing. An old miniature PC with an Intel Atom, which I retrofitted with an SSD, is the designated candidate for this permanent task. The syslog server comes courtesy of the standard rsyslogd. In its configuration file (/etc/rsyslog.conf), the following lines ensure that the server can receive syslog data from other hosts via UDP and TCP:

$ModLoad imudp
$UDPServerRun 514
$ModLoad imtcp
$InputTCPServerRun 514

On the other machines, I added an entry of *.* @10.0.0.254 to rsyslog.conf so that they all send their log data to the server on 10.0.0.254.

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