Command-line browsers Lynx, Links, and w3m

SURFING THE SHELL

Article from Issue 54/2005
Author(s):

If you’re working at the command line and you need to reach the

Internet, or if you just want to convert an HTML file into neatly formatted

ASCII text, try a text-based web browser.

Text-mode surfing may seem like a

last resort, but a text-based

browser is sometimes the perfect

tool. In this month’s Command Line,

you’ll learn about the no-GUI browsers

Lynx [1], Links [2], and w3m [3].

Lynx

You can launch Lynx in a terminal or a

virtual console by typing lynx – if you

prefer, you can pass a URL or the

address of a local HTML file to the

browser when you launch it, e.g.:

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