Gargoyle: Web Interface for Router Configuration

Jul 17, 2009

The Gargoyle project is working on an alternative web interface for better router configuration. The project has now reached its first stable version 1.0.

Gargoyle is a router interface for devices of the Linksys WRT54G series and other small routers such as the La Fonera. The software is based on the recently released OpenWrt firmware Kamikaze and targets not only power users but speaks especially to the average user as well. It provides functions not usually found in router firmware, such as smart DynDNS support, QoS and used bandwidth monitoring.

Among the enhancements of the stable version 1.0 are improved bandwidth quotas, a new Web authentication system and new access restrictions. The version shows "significantly improved stability" and developers fixed some major bugs. The features unify Gargoyle into an attractive Web interface that is "at least as easy to configure as any existing firmware."

Downloads of the software are available at the Gargoyle website. Installation can be in one of two ways: install the Gargoyle image on the router, or install the OpenWrt Kamikaze firmware followed by the Gargoyle packages. BUt be careful: a firmware installation error can permanently disable your router. Be sure ahead of time that your device supports OpenWrt. A Gargoyle FAQ provides further background and guidance.

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