W3Perl 3.00 Sends Web Statistics by Mail

Aug 29, 2007

Version 3.00 of the free logfile analyzer W3Perl has just been released, and includes a number of enhancements. Among other features, the program now supports weekly and monthly statistics with the same granularity as daily reports, and can email the results if needed.

Automated mails include statistics in HTML or PDF format. Another new feature: the download page now has a Debian package. Developer Laurent Domisse credits the updated RPM package to the Mandriva team.

The logfile analyzer, which is written in Perl, has been around for over 10 years, and is GPLv2 licensed. The program can be installed directly on a Web server, or alternatively on a desktop where it automatically downloads the logfiles for local evaluation. A CGI version gives Webmasters a browser-based administrative front-end.

W3Perl can interpret the Common Logfile Format (CLF), the Extended Version (ECLF) and the Microsoft IIS Webserver format, among others – a Windows version of the program is available. In addition to this, the package analyzes FTP server, Real Server and Squid Proxy server logs. According to the developers, you can even teach the program your own formats.

For more details, see the changelog and the documentation on the project website. A demo site gives administrators a sneak preview.

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